Tips to keep pets safe in Arizona's extreme heat - CBS 5 - KPHO

Tips to keep pets safe in Arizona's extreme heat

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Maricopa County Animal Care and Control urges pet owners to be responsible and use common sense to protect their pets from Arizona's extreme heat. Chances are if it's too hot for you, it's too hot for your pet. (Source: CBS 5 News file photo) Maricopa County Animal Care and Control urges pet owners to be responsible and use common sense to protect their pets from Arizona's extreme heat. Chances are if it's too hot for you, it's too hot for your pet. (Source: CBS 5 News file photo)
PHOENIX (CBS5) -

With record or near-record triple-digit summer temperatures in Arizona, people are not the only beings in danger of heat-related illness or death.

Maricopa County Animal Care and Control urges pet owners to keep their animals safe in the extreme heat.

On June 3, 2014, when the Phoenix high reached 110 degrees, a 6-month-old puppy died after being left in a closed up vehicle in direct sunlight while his owner was in a mall.

To avoid such tragic events. MCACC offers the following tips:

Keep pets indoors: On extremely hot days, MCACC urges pet owners to keep pets inside. If It's impossible to bring the animal indoors, ensure the pet has access to shade the entire day. A dog house does not allow air to circulate and provides no relief from the heat. Tree shade, covered patios or tarps are preferable.

Provide plenty of fresh, clean water: Just like people, pets can get dehydrated. Provide plenty of water in a spill-proof, non-metal bowl and if possible, keep it someplace shaded. Change the water daily and remember that many pets won't drink if the water is too hot.

Limit exercise on hot days: While a dog's paw pads might be tough, they are still sensitive and can be burned when walking on hot pavement. Limit a dog's exercise on hot days and limit walks to early morning or late evening hours. If it's too hot for bare feet, chances are it is too hot for a dog's paws.

Don't leave pets in parked cars: Even with the windows cracked, the temperature inside a car can soar within minutes. On an 85-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes.

Watch a dog around water: Not all dogs are naturally good swimmers and owners should make sure pets are supervised when near swimming pools. Teach a dog where the steps to the pool are so that it can exit easily.

Know the signs of heat stroke: Heavy panting, glazed eyes, rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, lethargy and vomiting are all signs of heatstroke. If a pet exhibits any of these symptoms get the pet out of the heat, apply cool (not cold) water compresses to the pet's feet and head, and contact a veterinarian immediately.

Dogs that are elderly, very young, overweight and not conditioned to exercise are more at risk for heat stroke. Dogs cool themselves by panting and brachycephalic breeds (snub-nosed) such as pugs, bulldogs, shih tzus, Boston terriers, boxers, etc. often have more difficulty during extreme heat due to their facial structure.

Copyright 2014 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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